Eigg Gaelic Place names

THE PLACE NAMES OF EIGG – AN INTRODUCTION

By naming places, people express something about their life, culture, history and superstitions. Once established, place names endure and impart uniqueness to a locality. On Eigg as in the rest of the Highlands and islands, place names are particularly descriptive of the shape, colour and size of landscape features. But they also owe much to the folklore, culture and customs of the islanders throughout the ages.

The Celtic Influence 
To ancient Celts, 4,000 years ago, the sound ‘aub’ denoted ‘life-sustaining water’; it survives in ‘abhainn’ a river as in Abhainn Gleann Charadail (Glen Caradal’s river). Much later it is the language of their descendants, the colonising Gaels from Ireland which impacts most on the island’s place names.

The Land as a Body
The Gaels’ celtic ancestors looked at the land as the body of the goddess Earth. They interpreted its features as part of her body.  Sròn, – the nose – is a sharp promontory, Druim – back – is a ridge, pap or mam – breast-  is a hill,  Cruachan – hip – is a circular stone outcrop, maol – bald  head – refers to a bare, rounded headland, Gualain – shoulder – is a rounded hillside. Bràighe – throat- is the upper part of a hill.

‘Colour coded’ place names
Gaelic place names frequently describe the feature’s colour. Buidhe (yellow), fionn (white), gorm (blue/green), dubh (dark/black), dearg (red), ‘Breac’ (speckled), are among those most commonly used: Beinn Bhuidhe (the Yellow mountain), Beannan Breaca (the speckled mountain), Blàr Dubh (the dark marsh), Bruach Dearg (the red steps).

Place names referring to nature
References to trees, plants and animals are common – e.g. Creag nan Druideag (the starling’s crag) Sgeir nan Sgarbh (Cormorant skerry), Carn nan Gobhar (goat’s cairn), Sròn na h-iolaire (Eagle’s promontory) Poll nam partan (crab pool), Lageorna (the barley hollow).

Mountain place-names.
There is a wealth of descriptive words for mountainous features. Many of these are found on the island. Aonach is a mountain whose summit has the form of a ridge with steepish sides. Leitir means literally half-land (leth tir) and describes a slope running down to the water’s edge. Bruach is also a slope but one that shows steps or bank. Beinn is a mountain; Corr denotes a pointed feature as in Corra bhein – the pointed mountain, Bidein, a pinnacle as in Bidein an Tigherna. Sgurr is a sharp promontory – with An Sgurr on Eigg, “The” sharp promontory by excellence.

Sea-farers place-names
The next important influence on place-names in the Hebrides was that of Viking settlers from Norway, who contributed their sea farers’ vocabulary describing coastal features in detail: Bogha (low point), sgeir (skerry), vik (bay), ness (projecting headland) as in Bogha Thangaraidh ( the point of the tangle garden), dubh Sgeir (black skerry), Lathaig (surf bay). The Vikings also introduced a system of land taxation, which endured in farm names such as Coig peighinnean (five penny) denoting a certain size of land.

But as Viking and Gaels merged into one culture – that of the Gall-Gaidheal (foreign Gaels) – the Gaelic language too absorbed the Old Norse. Thus the name of Eigg itself – Eilean Eige is a combination of Gaelic (Eilean – island) and Old Norse (Eag: wedge or notch) referring to the shape of the Sgurr of Eigg against the sky.

Place names associated with work and people
Many place names also refer to work on land or sea: airidh is the summer shieling as in Corrairidh, the pointed shieling, Bogha an Iasgaich: Fisherman’s point. Work with sheep is alluded to in Faing Ruadh: the red fank-  or with bringing the crops: Cnoc an t-Sabhail: barn hill. People, some of them now sadly forgotten,  are also commemorated as in Clach Alasdair: Alasdair’s rock, Loch Nighean Dhugaill, the Loch of Dugalds’s daughter, carn na Pìobaire (The piper’s cairn).

Place names and folklore
Early Christian missionary routes may be traced through names like Cill Donnan, the site of Donnan’s church. Uamh a’ Chrabhaidh, * the cave of worship) refers to the cave used by priests in hiding after the reformation. Belief in fairies and other otherwordly creatures is attested by numerous fairy knolls – Cnoc an t- Sithean ( the fairy hill), Na Sitheanan (the fairy mounds)   Lòn nan Gruagach (the pool of the watermaiden),  Cnoc oilteag (hill of the Broonie).

However, while most derivations are usually straightforward, some meanings still remain obscure, and are now lost in the mists of time.

It is all the more important to understand and use the island’s original place-names. This will allow them to be passed on to future generations so that they can continue to transmit the spirit of the place.

The Colour Coded Walks

We have a number of walks on Eigg, which are colour coded.  Below is the Gaelic Translations for points of interest on the Red, Green and Yellow track walks

 Ilean Eige

The “island of the notch”. Eag ( genitiveEige) meaning notch or wedge  in Gaelic refers to the distinctive shape of the Sgurr on the skyline

Pier, The Sgurr, Grulin and the Lochs,  (red, green and yellow tracks)  

Galmisdale:

Like many other coastal place names on the island, comes from the Old Norse Galmr (roaring surf) and Dalr (valley), meaning the valley of the roaring surf. It is  the name of the area of land from the pier to the base of the Sgurr, which was one of the eight island farms in Clan times and up to the 1900’s

Eilean Chasteail:

Looking across from Galmisdale Point, Eilean Chasteail –  Castle Island – is actually an approximate rendition of “Eilean Thàthasdail,” Hasdal’s island named after a Norse Giant – Thàthasdal (Hasdal)  associated with it in the island‘s mythology, and which used to fight with another giant named  Thuthasdal (Husdal)  (see Grulin).

Rudha an Iasgaich:

The “ fishing promontory” on Eilean Thàthasdail

Maol an Eilean:

The brow of the island”. Maol  – meaning  “bald head” in Gaelic – refers to the rounded island summit where the grave of Robert Laurie Thomson is situated. RL Thomson owned Eigg and Muck from 1890 to 1913.

Bogha Mhac Gill’ Iosa:

The “promontory of the companion of Jesus”. This may refer to a holy man that may have found refuge from the world on the island in Early Christian times.

Creig nan Sgarbh:

Prominent rock facing Eigg, meaning the Cormorant’s point.

Sgeir nam Bagh:

Bay rock” the distinctive flat reef on the south east side of Eigg after Galmisdale point on which the new pier is now situated.  Sgeir is an Old Norse word.

Garbh Sgeir:

Garbh Sgeir is the Cormorant skerry, and many cormorants do indeed use it as their resting spot. It mark the access channel to the new pier.

Flod Sgeir: left of Garbh Sgeir is mostly visible at low tide, hence its name, floating skerry

Rubha na Tankaird:

Tankard Point, between the pier at Galmisdale Point and the caves.

Nead na Feannaig:

Crows’ Nest”, the name was given to a pair of cottages converted in a home for the MacPherson family who owned Eigg from 1828 to 1890, probably because of the view they offered of the bay and the mainland. The name now applies to the house build in the 1930’s by the next owners –the Runciman family – as the doctor and then the factor’s residence.

Leth – Allt:

Half stream. This stream running down the Sgurr right of Nead  na Feannaig and the Lodge used to mark the northern boundary of Galmisdale farm.

Galmisdale Farmhouse: 

Built on kelp profit in the 18th century, this farmhouse was a hotel and post office in the late 19th century.

Tobar Chatriona:

St Catherine’s well, a well concealed well below the track, opposite the start of the Sgurr track.  It was one of many holy wells on the island.

Carn na Piòbaire:

Piper’s Cairn: the cairn was built to commemorate the resting place of the funeral party that took a famous 18thcentury piper, An Piòbair Mòr (the great piper) Donald MacQuarrie, who had studied with the famous Skye MacCrimmons, from his home in Upper Grulin to the graveyard at Kildonan. Everyone that passes the cairn is duty bound to add a stone in memory of the Piòbair Mòr

Gualainn na Sgùrra:

The Shoulder of the Sgurr. Gualainn is a gaelic word applying to a rounded hillside similar in shape  to a shoulder.

Cnoc airigh Dhonnchaidh Mhic Neill;

Hill of Duncan Mac Neill’s shieling. Refers to an area that would have been used as summer pasture, below Gualainn na Sgurra 

Garbh bealach:

The rough pass

Cnoc an Uillean;

Elbow hill : distinctive hill on the left of the track before reaching Upper Grulin.

Grulin Uachdrach:

Upper Grulin.  Grulin, an Old Norse word meaning stony place, was one of the island 8 farms or tacks until the mid 19th century when the township inhabitants were cleared to make way for sheep in 1853.  Grulin then became part of Laig farm for a time. It is now part of Sandavore Farm which encompasses the southern part of the island.

Clach Thùsthasdail :

Husdal’s Stone: this huge erratic boulder of Sgurr stones was held by legend to be the limpet hammer of the Norse giant  Husdal (Thùsthasdal)

 Tobar nam ban Naòimh:

The well of the holy woman. The water from this well springs from under Clach Thùsthasdal . Its name infers that there may have been a nun living there as an Early Christian hermit in the 7th century.

Dubh Sgeir:

Dark skerry. This is a prominent skerry between Eigg  and Muck

Maol Eskernis:

Eskernish headland. (The word maolindicates that it is rounded in shape) 

Sgeir Eskernis:

Eskernish skerry

Grulin Iochdrach:

Lower Grulin.  In the early 18th century this was the tack and farmhouse occupied by Iain Dubh Mac ’ic Ailean – John MacDonald, a tacksman from the Benbecula branch of the Clanranalds.  A poet and veteran of the 1715 rising, he was given Lower Grulin in recompense for his military service and lived there until his death, farming and composing stirring Jacobite verses. 

Allt na Criche:

Stream of the Marsh, running down from the Sgurr.

Sgeir Sgaothaig:

Skerry of the little swarm, flat skerry west of Lower Grulin

Bogha na Curaich:

Coracle Reef. This reef is only visible at low tide1/2 mile west from Lower Grulin

AN SGURR AND THE LOCHS 

An Sgùrr 

The Sharp Peak”  The distinctive shape of the Sgurr has given prominence in Gaelic, making it “the” sharp peak by excellence. It represents the abrupt nose of a mile long ridge of hard columnar pitchstone lava, the remains of an ancient river bed filled by lava from the Rum volcano during an ash -flow style eruption and left proud amongst the softer surrounding basalt by ice erosion.

Gualainn na Sgùrra:

The Shoulder of the Sgurr. Gualainn is a gaelic word applying to a rounded ridge remisnescent of a shoulder in shape

Cnoc airigh Dhonnchaidh Mhic Neill:

Hill of Duncan Mac Neill’s shieling. Refers to an area that would have been used as summer pasture, below  Gualainn na Sgurra

Bruach Dearg:

The red steps. The abrupt slope below the Gualainn nan Sgurra beyond Leth- Alt and above the Sandavore woods .

Còra Bheinn – (Coraven):

“Pointed Mountain”, a conical ben made of columnar basalt  south of the Sgurr

Loch Caol na Cora Bheinn:

This little L- shaped loch shows a narrow part in its middle, hence “ the narrow loch of the Corabheinn” nestles under the Coraven.

An Corrach:

The pointed one: continuation of the Sgurr ridge , left of Loch na Ban Mora

Loch Nighean Dhughaill:

Loch of Dugald’s daughter, named after a Grulin girl who fell prey to the dreaded Each Uisge, the water-horse which sometimes assumed human shape.

Abhainn  Gleann Charadail:

Glen Caradal river: the large stream flowing from Loch Nighean Dhughaill towards  Laig.   

Gleann Charadail:

Glen of the twisting valley, Caradal being a combination of Dalr, Old Norse for valley and “car” meaning “twisting, meandering” in Gaelic.

Cnoc Creagach:

The craggy hill: again a descriptive place name for this high rocky hill below the Coraven  right of  Glen Haradal.

Cnoc airigh Mhic Dhomhnall Bhain:

Hill of the shileing of the son of fair Donald.Refers to an area that would have been used as summer pasture, below Cnoc Creagach    

Beanan Breaca:

Speckled mountain, an accurate description of the remarkable cobbled structure of the Sgurr ridge, in this instance, the end of the ridge above Loch Beinn Tighe and opposite Beinn Tighe.

Loch Beinn Tighe:

The loch of Ben Tighe

Beinn Tighe:

Possibly Mountain of the House, or as“Tighe” also means “Fatest , thickest”, this word possibly refers to the large size of that part of the ridge: ie “the fat mountain.”  

Sliabh Beinn Tighe:

“The mountain ridge of Ben Tighe.” The large mostly flat area on the west side of Glen Caradal.

Bidein Boidheach:

Beautiful summit  – the top of the sea cliffs marking the abrupt end of the Sgurr ridge.

Rubha an Fhasaidh 

Promontary of  delivery

THE PIER, CAVES, LODGE GARDEN AND MANSE WOOD WALK.
(Purple and Yellow tracks)

Galmisdale Point:

Galmisdale, like many other coastal place names on the island, comes from the Old Norse Galmr (roaring surf) and Dalr (valley), meaning the valley of the roaring surf. It is the name of the area of land from the pier to the base of the Sgurr, which was one of the eight island farms in Clan times and up to the 1900’s

Eilean Chasteail:

Looking across from Galmisdale Point, Eilean Chasteail –  Castle Island – is actually an approximate rendition of “Eilean Thàthasdail,”Hasdal’s island named after a Norse Giant –Thàthasdal (Hasdal)  associated with it in the island‘s mythology, and which used to fight with another giant named  Thuthasdal (Husdal)  (see Grulin).

Rudha an Iasgaich:

The “ fishing promontory” on Eilean Thàthasdail

Maol an eilean:

The brow of the island”. Maol  – meaning  “bald head” in Gaelic – refers to the rounded island summit where the grave of Robert Laurie Thomson is situated. RL Thomson owned Eigg and Muck from 1890 to 1913.

Bogha Mhac Gill’ Iosa:

The “promontory of the compagnon of Jesus ”. This may refer to a holy man that may have found refuge from the world on the island in Early Christian times.

Creag nan Sgarbh

Cormorant’s point. , a  prominent rock facing Eigg,

Sgeir nam Bagh

Bay rock”: the distinctive flat reef on the south east side of Eigg after Galmisdale point: on which the new pier is now situated. Sgeir is an Old Norse word.

Garbh Sgeir:

Garbh Sgeir is the Cormorant skerry, and many cormorants do indeed use it as their resting spot. It marks the access channel to the new pier.

Flod Sgeir:

Flod Sgeir, left of Garbh Sgeir is mostly visible at low tide, hence its name,  floating skerry

Rubha na Tankaird:

Tankard Point, between the pier at Galmisdale Point and the caves.

Nead na Feannaig:

Crows’ nest”, the name was given to a pair of cottages converted in a home for the MacPherson family who owned Eigg from 1828 to 1890, probably because of the view they offered of the bay and the mainland. The name now applies to the house build in the 1930’s by the next owners –the Runciman family – as the doctor and then the factor’s residence.

THE CAVES

a’ Chleit :

Another name from the Old Norse which means “the rockface”, refers to the vertical rocky outcrop on the shore, right of Galmisdale point, and south of Craigard.

Craig nam Faoileann:

Seagull’s crag: a distinctive crag on the coast below Craigard

Craigard:

High crag” refers to a circular rocky outcrop overlooking a’ Chleit and the cliffs on the south coast of Eigg.  It is now associated with the cottage build below it.

Uamh Fhraing:

Francis’s cave” is Eigg’s infamous Massacre Cave where the islanders took refuge from a retaliatory MacLeod’s raid in the early 17thcentury. They were eventually found and suffocated to death when a fire lit at the entrance deprived them from oxygen. Their bones remained in the cave until collecting by early tourists caused them to be finally buried in hallowed ground in the late 19th century.

Uamh na Chrabhaidh:

Literally the “Cave of devotion”, now known as “Cathedral cave” where priests used to land to celebrate mass in secret during the times of Catholic proscription (late 17th century)

SANDAVORE :

“ The large sandy place”. The name Sanda in Sanda Mhòr  (Sandavore) like in Sanda Bheag (Sandaveg) – the small sandy place  – the neighbouring area, comes from the Old Norse.  Both Sandavore and Sandaveg stretch from the sandy beaches at the pier to the hills towards the middle of the island, and were two of the 8 farms or tacks in which the island was divided in clan times.  Sandavore farmhouse was once an inn where a famous piper lived, MacDonald of Cross Farm near Arisaig.

Cnoc Parlain :

MacFarlane‘s hill, the hill left of the track or the main road by the post box. 

Druim an Alt: 

The ridge of the Stream, on which the solar panels are situated  

Druim Liurnais:

Possibly  “Noisesome ridge”, the large piece of ground right of the main road up from Pier Hill.

CLANRANALD PIER AND SHELL BEACH 

Leth – Allt:

Half-Stream. This stream running down the Sgurr used to mark the boundary of Galmisdale farm. It feeds a hydroelectric dam, which is part of Eigg’s green grid.

Gortain ‘ic Iain :

Iain’s son’s field.  (Gortain is a small cornfield or patch of arable land.)  This long, flat piece of ground is now the location of the community orchard.

Ruigh na Traghad:

Beach field. Ruigh or righe being is a field generally situated at the bottom of a valley, in this case, it refers to the land below the woodland that slopes down to the beach, and where is situated the “official” wild camping site.

Eilean Feòir:

In Gaelic this means the Grassy island and is called in English “the Green island”  a grassy promontory where the arctic terns are nesting. Best to avoid it  at nesting time, as the terms will not hesitate to dive bomb the intruder!

Na Gurraban:

The crouching ones. This name refers to a small circular knoll at the point where the ruins of a house can be seen above the shore. The house was destroyed by the wave that took away the Tay Bridge.  At low tide, it is possible to walk to Kildonan through Poll nam Partan

Poll nam Partan :

Crab pool: that part of the bay was said to be especially good for crab fishing.

Kildonnan, orange track

Sandaveg:

“The Small Sandy place”, the name Sanda inSanda Bheag (Sandaveg)  like in Sanda Mhòr(Sandavore) – the large sandy place  – the neighbouring area, come from the Old Norse.  Both Sandaveg and Sandavore stretch from the sandy beaches at the pier to the hills towards the middle of the island, and were two of the 8 farms or tacks in which the island was divided in clan times. Sandaveg comprises the area with the doctor’s surgery, the Manse as far as the school.

Kildonnan:

Donnan’s church: the area is named at the monastic settlement established by Donnan, an early Christian saint in the 7th century. Donnan was martyred there on 17 April 617 with his monks. A new monastic community was re-established from Iona but was destroyed by Viking raiders. A parish church was established there in medieval time and endured until the Reformation, giving its name to the whole area, which was the main farm on the island in Clan times.

Na Breacanais:

The chequered ones: probably referring to the aspect of the ground

Cnoc na Breacanais:

Hill of the chequered ones.

Cnoc na Bhatagain:

Vatagan Hill  (meaning unknown)

Glac an Dorchadais:

Hollow of darkness

Blàr Mor:

The great marsh: refers to the large flat tract of land at the bottom of the Beinn Bhuidhe slopes.

Allt na Bhlàir Mhòir:

Burn of the Great Marsh

Bràighe:

Braes:  Braighe is an area mid way up a slope; here too is the place midway up to Beinn Bhuidhe:, at one time the location of a whole township, and where the Kildonnan fank is now situated.

Monadh a’ Bhràighe:

Braes’ moor. The moorland behind the township of Braighe

Ruigh na Traghad:

Beach field.  Ruigh or righe is a field that is generally situated at the bottom of a valley, in this case, it refers to the land below the woodland that slopes down to the beach , and where is situated the “official” wild camping site.  .

Eilean Feòir:

In Gaelic this means the Grassy Island and is called in English “the Green island” a grassy promontory where the arctic terns are nesting. Best to avoid it at nesting time, as the terns will not hesitate to dive bomb the intruder!

Na Gurraban:

The name refers to a small circular knoll at the point where the ruins of a house can still be seen. The house was destroyed by the wave that took away the Tay bridge. At low tide, it is possible to walk to Kildonnan through Poll nam Partan

Poll nam Partan: 

Crab Pool: the bay was good for fishing and all sorts of crabs could be caught there.

Druim an Aonaich:

Mountain Ridge: refers to the columnar structures towering above Kildonnan.

Allt a’ Mhuilin:

Mill burn

Taigh a Mhuillin:

Mill house: The 18th century Mill, complete with breast-shot wheel and dam was used to grind the islanders’ oats until the 1900’s. It was built by the chief of Clanranald as a modern improvement to his island estate: the reluctant islanders were forced to use it after their hand-querns were broken on his orders.

Crois Mhòr:

Big Cross: The large field on the east side of the burial ground stretching up to the coast. There was a tradition that there was a cross standing there at one time, hence the name of the field.

Crois Bheag:

Small Cross: the small field opposite the burial ground

Taigh a ‘ Bràighe:

Braes house.

Taigh Bhreac:

The speckled house: now known as Hill cottage, this was the place given by Clanranlad to his batman Maclennan after the ‘45.

Rubha na Crannaig:

Crannog Point: the site of an Iron Age fort which may at one time have only been accessible at low tide as the name of the point would suggest.  Its circle of grass-grown boulders shows evidence of later use, possibly as a monastic settlement in the 7thcentury.

Eilean Dubh an Fhaing:

The dark island of the fank

Leac a’ Ghuidal:

flat rock of Guidal

The  Woodland  walks & Laig  (light green and dark blue tracks)        

School to Laig via Cuagach 

Glac an Dorchadais:

The hollow of darkness,  now part of the new  forestry opposite the school  

Beinn Bhuidhe:

Yellow mountain: take its name from the bent grass turning yellow in the autumn

An Cruachan:

The hip: the craggy outcrop at the summit of Beinn Bhuidhe 

Cam Lòn:

The Crooked pool

Allt a’ cham Lòn:

The burn of the crooked pool. This  burn coming down Beinn Bhuidhe makes a sharp turn to join onto Allt a’ Bhlàir Dhuibh

Cachlaibh nam Marbhaidh: 

The gateway of the dead: the boundary between the Cleadale and Kildonnan farms, where people passed through with a funeral cortege, where Allt a’ Cham Lòn passes through the road.

Chleith Mhòir:

The great hill. Cleith being yet another name for hill, this time meaning high ground.

Sgumban:

The Sgumban: a bump on the road where vehicles jump when going fast, much to children’s delight.

Bealach Clithe:

The steep pass: refers to the steep descent into Cuagach and Cleadale  

Allt a’ bhealaich chlithe:

The burn of the steep pass

Cnoc Smeòrdail:

Butterdale hill: An Old Norse place name referring to what would have been a hill surrounded by rich pasture in the narrow valley which runs off Bealach where it turns sharply at right angle.

Sròn Laimhrige:

Anchorage Point: the rocky promontory below the Bealach Chlithe at the edge of a large  boggy area.  Its name hints that it may have been at one time at the edge of a shallow bay where Vikings anchored their ship. Parts of a Viking longship were recovered in the peat nearby.

A ‘Chuagach:

The awkward place: referring to the awkward bend in the road after the Bealach.

Allt a Chuagach:

Cuagach burn: The burn coming down from Beinn Bhuidhe down to Laig bay.

WOODLAND WALK TO LAIG

Blàr Dubh:

Dark marsh

Allt a’ Bhlàr Dubh:

Burn of the dark marsh

Coire nam Fala:

The blood corrie: this narrow corrie was the place where cattle were taken to be bled at the end of winter when food was scarce.  Blood mixed with oatmeal made a kind of black pudding.  

Bealach Airidh an Leir:

Pass of the shieling of the sight : meaning unclear, but could be referring to the place where an islander experienced the second sight by having a vision of black face sheep flocks then unknown on the island.

Lochan na Fhiantaiche:

Lochan of the footprint: the footprint was said to have been that of a giant.

Druim an Lochain:

Lochan ridge

Lathaig (Laig):

Surf beach: a name coming from the Old Norse. The historic 18th century farmhouse is built on an ancient site overlooking what would have been shallow waters in Viking times, enabling ships to be drawn far inland: Laig was originally the seat of the MacDonalds of Laig, a junior branch of the Clanranalds, who led the Eigg men at war during many risings, including the 1745 when 12 of the surviving Eigg men who rose with Bonnie Prince Charlie were condemned to be transported to Jamaica. From 1790, the farm was tenanted by Ranald MacDonald, son of Alexander MacDonald, the greatest Gaelic poet of its time, who himself compiled an anthology of Gaelic poetry known as the Eigg Collection.

Na Sidheanan:

The fairy mounds. These distinctively pointed hills stand at some distance behind Laig.

Sidhean na Cailleach:

The fairy mound of the Hag. This little mound stands opposite the mouth of Abhainn Gleann Charadail

Cnoc Chroileaman:

Possibly Hill of the little fold 

Traigh Chlithe Lèadail:

Should be Traigh Chlèadail,Cleadale Strand, now known as Laig beach

Poll Duthaill:

Duthall’s pool . (meaning of Duthall unknown).

Clach Alaisdair / Clach an t-Sionach:

Alaisdair’s rock/Fox’s rock : a distinctive rock much used as perch for cormorants, named after the fearless islander that dove into the water at that point to “outfox” the pressgang pursuing him.

 

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